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NASA Mission Juno Project

I’m thrilled to announce that my commercial reel is now being hosted on the #Freethebid website. Special thanks to the folks at MAKE for making that happen.

Only 9.7 percent of rostered directors on the Adage Production Company A-List are women – only slightly higher than the seven percent of women who directed the top 250 movies in 2016. 

#FreetheBid is an initiative guaranteeing women directors an equal opportunity to bid on commercial jobs in the advertising world. The initiative “calls for brands to encourage their agencies to include female directors in the bidding process and asks production companies to add more women to their rosters.”

The #FreeTheBid website hosts the reels of women directors, both signed to production companies and those without representation. It tracks the work that women do as a result of the initiative and will organize agency screenings featuring female talent as well as events to showcase work done by those who are a part of the platform.

Coca-Cola, McCann, JWT, BBDO, FCB, Mother, Ebay are among those pledging to include women directors in production bids.

#FreeTheBid founder and award-winning director Alma Har’el :

“I’m starting #freethebid so the ad industry can come together and take an affirmative step towards addressing what stops advertisers from working with women directors. I couldn’t have been an independent filmmaker and make the films I love if I didn’t make a living directing commercials. I want to make sure other women filmmakers have the same chance to sustain themselves while being creative and shaping the way women are represented in advertising. We have to start the change right now in the only practical and effective way – let women be heard.”

So yeah, let’s do this!

 

Special thanks to Bill Winters for many of these behind-the-scenes shots and for always making our collaborations look so beautiful.

“Everything about Jupiter is extreme; it’s a planet on steroids” — Scott Bolton, Principal Investigator, Mission Juno

This illustration depicts NASA's Juno spacecraft at Jupiter, with its solar arrays and main antenna pointed toward the distant sun and Earth. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

This illustration depicts NASA’s Juno spacecraft at Jupiter, with its solar arrays and main antenna pointed toward the distant sun and Earth. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

July 4th is a day of celebration, and not just for Independence Day!  It is also the day that the spacecraft Juno will finally reach its destination Jupiter after a 5-year voyage.  Juno should reach the planet’s orbit by tonight (July 4) and will then spend 18 months studying what lies beneath Jupiter’s thick cloud cover.

From NASA:

“During Juno’s orbit-insertion phase, or JOI, the spacecraft will perform a series of steps in preparation for a main engine burn that will guide it into orbit. At 6:16 p.m. PDT (9:16 p.m. EDT), Juno will begin to turn slowly away from the sun and toward its orbit-insertion attitude. Then 72 minutes later, it will make a faster turn into the orbit-insertion attitude.

After the main engine burn, Juno will be in orbit around Jupiter. The spacecraft will spin down from 5 to 2 RPM, turn back toward the sun, and ultimately transmit telemetry via its high-gain antenna.

Juno starts its tour of Jupiter in a 53.5-day orbit. The spacecraft saves fuel by executing a burn that places it in a capture orbit with a 53.5-day orbit instead of going directly for the 14-day orbit that will occur during the mission’s primary science collection period. The 14-day science orbit phase will begin after the final burn of the mission for Juno’s main engine on October 19.”

I had the great honor of filming some early interviews with Juno’s scientists and engineers leading up to the launch for the official Mission Juno website.  In honor of this momentous occasion, I’m reposting a piece about the project.

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Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

With NASA’s announcement of the confirmation of water on Mars, I’m posting a nod to some fiction inspired by our celestial brother.

Mars has long captured the imagination of storytellers since the discovery of the “canals” provoked the idea of ancient civilization on the red planet.

  • War of the Worlds, HG Wells (1897)

Equally compelling are the stories about the colonization of the planet.

  • Red Planet, Robert Heinlein (1949)
  • The Sands of Mars, Arthur C Clarke (1951)

Colonization breeds imperialism, a theme that was especially prevalent in works from the 1950s, a hot topic on this planet.

  • The Martian Chronicles, Ray Bradbury (1950)
  • The Sirens of Titan, Kurt Vonnegut (1959)

Most recently, I enjoyed The Martian (2011) written by Andy Weir, which Ridley Scott has adapted for the big screen. The verisimilitude of surviving on the surface of Mars is remarkable. Sticking to the science of human space travel, once again the story reflects the times in which it was written.  Today a journey to Mars could happen in the next 15 years.

The Juno spaceprobe in front of the planet Jupiter (Artist's Concept). NASA/JPL 2011

The Juno spaceprobe in front of the planet Jupiter (Artist’s Concept). NASA/JPL 2011

Exactly two years ago today, I was heading down to Cape Canaveral to direct a number of short films about the Juno project, NASA’s mission to Jupiter.   Juno is a spacecraft that will spend one year orbiting Jupiter, making scientific observations of the planet’s gravity, magnetic fields and composition.  I conducted interviews with the scientists and engineers who worked on the project, and we filmed the launch on Aug 5, 2011. Read More

photos courtesy of Bill Winters

Not only is the Intrepid an aircraft carrier, it’s a working museum and a film location.  The aircraft carrier Intrepid (CVS-11) first served in World War II, became one of the primary recovery vessels for NASA, and served three tours of duty during the Vietnam conflict.  It is now a national historic landmark and one of the most unique attractions in New York City.
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